Completing an Honours year with your science degree can open the door to many opportunities!

A science honours program provides you with the opportunity to pursue an independent research project in an area of your interest under the supervision of an academic staff member.

You will acquire skills which will enable you to work without close supervision in a research environment in industry or government, or to proceed to a research higher degree. Through honours you can:

  • Undertake exciting original research
  • Develop skills highly sought by employers
  • Enhance your career prospects

To attend the Science Honours Week Events and explore your honours options, please register your attendance via the below online form.

Science Honours Week Events:

DATE

EVENT DETAILS

MON
28 Aug

School of Veterinary Science
11:30am - 1:30pm - Honours presentation
Plant Industries Building 8111, lecture room 113 -
Gatton Campus

Presentations by the Bachelor of Science (Honours) - Animal and Veterinary Bioscience Program Coordinator and the Bachelor of Veterinary Technology (Honours) Program Coordinator; presentations by current Honours candidates about the research; question and answer session.

TUE
29 Aug

School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
12 - 1pm – Honours Information Session
Room 228/229, Steele Building (3) – St Lucia

The following information session will be run by Honours Coordinators and Past Honours students to give students an insight into what they can expect from an honours/research thesis year, and what opportunities it will present to them, both during their research year and after graduation. The session will cover the following programs, which offer a research thesis:

- BSc and badvsc (Hons) Geographical Sciences
- BSc  and badvsc (Hons) Geology
- BSc (Hons) Exploration Geophysics
- BEnvMan (Hons) (in program thesis)
- BEnvSc (Hons) (in program thesis)
- BRTP (Hons) (in program thesis) 

Refreshments provided. SEES research information can be found here.

WED
30 Aug

TBC

THU
31 Aug

TBC

FRI
1 Sep

The School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
12:30 - 2pm - Chemistry Podium, Chemistry Building (68)

With information booths by the School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences, Australian Institute of Bioengineering & Nanotechnology (AIBN), Centre for Advanced Imaging (CAI),  Institute of Molecular Bioscience (IMB), Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) and The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute (UQDI). Researchers will be present to provided information and answer questions. Lunch provided.

Biomedical Sciences
4 - 7pm - Physiology lecture theatre/foyer (63-360)
Information session for current Honours students about transitioning from Honours into a PhD. This session will include:

- “nuts and bolts” information on how to apply for a PhD position and scholarship
- Potential career pathways that lead from a PhD
- Informal networking session (with refreshments) where students can talk to academics and potential supervisors about projects.

For more SBMS Honours information go to www.biomedical-sciences.uq.edu.au/study/honours

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES - Honours information session has been scheduled for Tuesday 2nd October from 1 – 2pm in Room 257, Goddard. For any SBS Honours information please contact the school or go to www.biology.uq.edu.au/honours-information

AGRICULTURE & FOOD SCIENCES - Will not be running a session during Honours Week. For any SAFS Honours information please contact the school or go to www.agriculture.uq.edu.au/honours-programs

MATHEMATICS & PHYSICS - Will not be running a session during Honours Week. For any SMP Honours information please contact the school or go to www.smp.uq.edu.au/content/honours-studies


Honours Coordinators & Projects

Find an honours coordinator and more information on available projects.

If you cannot attend the information sessions, but would like to enquire about Honours studies, please contact the respective Honours Coordinator: 

School Honours Coordinators & Useful Websites

School of Agriculture and
Food Sciences

Dr Steve Johnston (BAppSci) - s.johnston1@uq.edu.au
Prof Bhesh Bhandari (BFood Tech) - b.bhandari@uq.edu.au
Dr Nidhi Bansal (BSc - Food Science) - n.bansal@uq.edu.au
Prof Peer Schenk (BSc - Plant Science) - p.schenk@uq.edu.au
Dr Doug George (BAgSc) - d.george@uq.edu.au

More information:
www.uq.edu.au/agriculture/honoursprogram

School of Biological Sciences

Dr Lyn Cook - l.cook@uq.edu.au

More information: www.biology.uq.edu.au/honours-information 

School of Biomedical Sciences

Dr Richard Clark (BBiomedSc) - richard.clark@uq.edu.au

School of Chemistry and
Molecular Biosciences

Dr Evan Moore (BSc - Chemistry) - egmoore@uq.edu.au
Dr Steve Reid (BBiotech) - steven.reid@uq.edu.au
Dr Ben Schulz - b.schulz@uq.edu.au
Dr Michael Landsberg - m.landsberg@uq.edu.au
 

School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Prof Gordon Southam (Geology) - g.southam@uq.edu.au
Dr Steve Hearn (Geophysics) - steveh@geoph.uq.edu.au
Dr David Pullar (Geographical Sciences) - d.pullar@uq.edu.au
Dr Annie Lau (Environmental Science) - annie.lau@uq.edu.au
Dr Bradd Witt (Environmental Management) - bwitt@uqg.uq.edu.au

More information: www.sees.uq.edu.au/study/honours-programs

School of Mathematics and Physics

Dr Masoud Kamgarpour (Maths) - masoud@uq.edu.au
Dr Michael Bromley (Physics) - brom@physics.uq.edu.au

More information: www.smp.uq.edu.au/content/honours-studies

School of Veterinary Science

Dr Michael Noad - mnoad@uq.edu.au
Dr Rebecca Dunlop - r.dunlop@uq.edu.au
 
More information: https://veterinary-science.uq.edu.au/honours
Australian Institute for Bioengineering & Nanotechnology

Tony Miscamble - t.miscamble@uq.edu.au

More information: www.aibn.uq.edu.au/honours

Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB)

postgrad-office@uq.edu.au (with subject title: Honours)

More information: Student Research Training booklet  (PDF 4.5 Mb)

Queensland Brain Institute (QBI)

qbistudents@uq.edu.au (with subject title: Honours)

More information: www.qbi.uq.edu.au/honours

The University of Queensland
Diamantina Institute

More information:
www.di.uq.edu.au/research-projects
www.tri.edu.au/filething/get/24103/20140815_Honours-Booklet-2014.pdf

 

 

Honours Student Testimonials

Find out what our honours students say about their honours year experience.

During her Honours Year, Chelsea Stroppiana investigated compounds released from the roots of Australian native species and how they affect nitrification in soil.

During her Honours Year, Chelsea Stroppiana investigated compounds released from the roots of Australian native species and how they affect nitrification in soil.

Chelsea Stroppiana

Bachelor of Agriculture Science (Honours)

For her Honours Year in the School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, 
Chelsea Stroppiana investigated compounds released from the roots of Australian native species and how they affect nitrification in soil.
 
When and why did you decide on studying Honours?
I decided to undertake the Honours program after several small stints of work experience in research laboratories. I thoroughly enjoy the challenges and small successes with this work. Completing an Honours degree or program is the first step to a research career.
 
What skills are and opportunities is studying Honours giving you in preparation for your career?
Completing the Honours program forced me to learn and understand concepts and processes that are difficult to fully grasp unless you’ve put them into practice. When it’s your project depending on you getting the science or calculations correct, you double check and ensure you’ve covered everything. Probably the key skill to come from Honours study is managing time and priorities; deciding what is most important, how much time tasks will take, and organising days, weeks, and months accordingly. I’m still learning how to do this well!

The best thing about Honours is the opportunities it presents. Of course the qualification at the end, which opens doors to research higher degrees, and make you a more attractive employee. But also the chance to get to know your lecturers and well-respected researchers in your field. If you’re lucky, the chance to travel may also present itself, and you may achieve some awards in recognition of your effort. 

Do you have any advice for students that are thinking about studying Honours in science?
It will be the best and worst thing you do as an undergrad! Be prepared for a lot of hard work, early mornings, late nights, etc. but take the time to enjoy the victories to – when things go to plan, getting good results, or an experiment is successfully wrapped up. Nothing worth doing is done easily!

  

Elizabeth Czislowski

During her Honours Year, Elizabeth Czislowski worked on Fusarium wilt - one of the greatest threats to banana production worldwide, including in Australia.

During her Honours Year, Elizabeth Czislowski worked on Fusarium wilt - one of the greatest threats to banana production worldwide, including in Australia.
Bachelor of Biotechnology

For her Honours Year in the School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, Elizabeth Czislowski worked on Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense (Foc), the fungal pathogen that causes Fusarium wilt of banana. Fusarium wilt is considered to be one of the greatest threats to banana production throughout the world, including in Australia.

When and why did you decide on studying Honours?
During my undergraduate studies I became increasingly interested in a career as a scientific researcher. I saw Honours as an important stepping stone to becoming a researcher and also as an invaluable opportunity to experience ‘real’ research.

What skills are and opportunities is studying Honours giving you in preparation for your career?
My experiences whilst undertaking Honours gave me skills that can be applied to any career such as effective communication, tenacity, innovative thinking and management skills. Studying Honours has given me the opportunity to access and interact with people from varied walks of life such as leading researchers from around the world through to Australian farmers. By choosing to study Honours, I have also been able to travel and present my research at an international research conference.

Do you have any advice for students that are thinking about studying Honours in science?
If you are not sure whether to study Honours, I encourage you to think about what you could gain from this experience. By studying Honours, you may find that research is something you have a great passion for and would like to make a career out of it. Alternatively, Honours may also help you to realise that research is not for you even if you love science (which is fine- there are many more aspects to science other than research). Deciding to study Honours could be the experience that helps you to find your path to your dream career whatever that may be!
If you already think you want to study Honours I recommend ‘shopping around’ for a supervisor as they have a huge impact on your Honours experience. It is well known that Honours can be stressful at times and it is the level of support you receive from your supervisor and the people in their research group that will make all the difference to you during Honours. 
 

  

Mark Jeffree uses a dilution refrigerator as part of his honours research.
Mark Jeffree uses a dilution refrigerator as part of his honours research.

Mark Jeffree

Bachelor of Science (Honours) - Physics

Mark's Honours project at the School of Mathematics and Physics uses a series of computer controlled microwave pulses to manipulate the quantum state of a superconducting qubit so that it can be fully characterized in a process called quantum tomography. This forms a useful test tool to validate quantum logic gates and quantum error correction.

When and why did you decide on studying Honours?
I returned later than most to study physics after more than 20 years as a professional programmer and signal processing engineer. I have always enjoyed the more mathematical aspects of computer science, and in some sense becoming an physics Honours student was a homecoming. When choosing my honours project, I wanted to be able to use my programming and electronics background rather than ignore it.

What skills are and opportunities is studying Honours giving you in preparation for your career?
I am undertaking honours after I've already wrapped up my career, for the main purpose of stretching my mind and perhaps as a stepping stone towards a PhD,  For those of you who might be planning to do this in a more conventional order, an Honours project provides access to some expensive and interesting equipment and the time to think really hard about some interesting problems.

Do you have any advice for students that are thinking about studying Honours in science
Being in a full-time job can be quite repetitive and sometimes even boring in comparison to doing your own research project. You may be driven by tight deadlines and constrained by tight budgets. Make the most of the opportunity to do an Honours project, if you can.

 

Luke O'Kane during field work in Indonesia.
Luke O'Kane during field work in Indonesia.

Luke O'Kane

BSc Honours (Geological Sciences)

For my project at the School of Earth Sciences I am applying geochemistry and geochronology to gold exploration in Indonesia. I visited an isolated island called Romang Island, which is currently being explored by an Australian company, and spent 4 weeks mapping and collecting samples. I am completing my honours thesis with the school of earth science.

When and why did you decide on studying Honours?
It was not until I was in the final year of my bachelor degree that I decided to consider participating in an honours research project. I was extremely interested in what we were learning in the classroom and I decided to complete an honours project so that I could continue learning whilst furthering my qualifications.
I was motivated by the idea of conducting my very own independent research project whilst still having the guidance and support network offered at the University of Queensland. With the assistance of the academic staff within my school I was able to organise a research project in Indonesia which sounded extremely interesting and was specific to my area of interest.

What skills are and opportunities is studying Honours giving you in preparation for your career?
Being given my very own, independent research project has helped to develop a strong sense of responsibility and also motivation to produce the best quality work that I am capable of. Seeing a project through from start to finish and being entirely responsible for the outcome is a truly rewarding experience and is an experience that you cannot attain from a bachelor degree. Furthermore, honours has helped me to improve my writing and communication skills and my ability to think critically as a scientist in order to approach different problems.

Through studying honours I have been given the opportunity to travel overseas, work alongside both industry and academic professionals and attend many different seminars and conferences.

Do you have any advice for students that are thinking about studying Honours in science?
Regardless of whether you are looking to enter the industry of continue with post graduate research, honours equips you with experience and skills that are applicable to any field. At UQ there is a strong support network and there is always people willing to help you out if you encounter problems throughout the year.

Completing an honours projects helps to keep your options open, with the opportunity of going on to complete further research (MSc or PhD) or entering the industry, where an honours degree is highly regarded. Nothing bad can result from attaining an honours degree, so if you are unsure about what you want to work as at the conclusion of your degree and you are generally interested in your field of study, then I strongly suggest that you give honours a go.

 

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